New pest risk analysis decision support tool in development from CABI

The Invasives Blog

Colorado beetle eats a potato leaves young.

A Pest Risk Analysis (PRA) allows National Plant Protection Organisations (NPPOs) to assess risks posed by pests or pathways of quarantine concern, and identify options to manage those risks. Recognising that there was a need for support in the completion of PRAs, CABI, under its Action on Invasives programme, has designed and is developing an online PRA tool.

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Farmers in Malawi fund first purpose-built permanent plant clinic to fight pests and diseases

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A group of farmers in Ntcheu district, Central Malawi, have clubbed together to fund the first purpose-built permanent plant clinic to help fight a range of crop-devastating pests and diseases that threaten their livelihoods and food security.

Pengapenga Plant Clinic, which previously operated under a tree in the market place, is now providing a more attractive and fit-for-purpose brick structure which is giving the 1,000 smallholder farmers it serves shelter from the rain.

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CABI’s latest ‘weapon’ in the fight against devastating crop pests showcased at Commission on Phytosanitary Measures

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Image courtesy of FAO

CABI’s latest ‘weapon’ in the fight against devastating crop pests has been presented to delegates at the International Plant Protection Convention’s (IPPC) Commission on Phytosanitary Measures (CPM) held recently at the FAO headquarters in Rome.

Dr Washington Otieno, CABI’s Plantwise Programme Executive, told delegates at the 14th session of the CPM that CABI’s new Pest Risk Analysis (PRA) tool provides National Plant Protection Organisations (NPPOs) with the ability to assess the risks posed by pests or pathways of quarantine concern and identify ways to manage those risks.

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Update: New Pest & Disease Records (05 April 2019)

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This month’s pest alerts include a report of a new species of Momphidae moth (Mompha lacteela) in the Netherlands, which is commonly found egg-laying on willowherb with its larvae mining in the plant roots (© Delphine Menárd)

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this month include the first report on North American poplar leaf rust fungus (Melampsora medusae) in China, reports on a new species of Momphidae identified in the Netherlands and a new relative of the Irish famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans in South America. Continue reading

Exploring the “art” in “climate-smart”

Originally published on CGIAR CCAFS

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Students showed their art works after a drawing contest in Tra Hat Climate-Smart Village. The contest showed that even at a young age, students can visualize their understanding of climate change issues. 

Art has a place in climate discussions. Children, who are usually deemed too young to understand complex topics such as climate change must be involved as well. 

A campaign with the theme “Climate Change: Youth Can Do Something” was organized on 7 October 2018 in Tra Hat Climate-Smart Village (CSV) in Vietnam by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security in Southeast Asia (CCAFS SEA) to enhance the youth sector’s understanding of climate change issues and enable them to visualize their learnings through their own drawings.

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Test your plant health knowledge with the plant doctor quiz

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>> Latest quiz just added

Plantwise plant doctors are at the heart of our plant clinic network providing advice and information to farmers, logging their data for the Plantwise Knowledge Bank, and always adapting to new outbreaks and technologies.

Think you’ve got what it takes to be a plant doctor? Take our online quiz and find out! Continue reading

Biopiracy: The misuse of patenting systems at the disadvantage of local communities

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Due to the increasing need for novel, untapped resources (biological and chemical), many research developments are looking at previously untouched and rural regions as a source for these new resources (© Pexels)

In the search for new bioresources in increasingly remote and rural regions, researchers will use the traditional knowledge of local communities to support their search for new, untapped plants, animals or chemical compounds. The ethical (and sometimes political) issues surrounding this come when this knowledge is used without permission, and exploits the local community’s assistance and culture for commercial gain. This is called biopiracy.

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