Could perennial crops be an answer to climate change?

Planting rice in China (© CABI)

Reblogged from The Economic Times

BENGALURU: While India reaped the benefits of the Green Revolution in the 1960s, her neighbour China is now taking the lead in another area of sustainable agriculture — developing crops that meet the challenges posed by global warming.

Chinese agricultural scientists are working to convert seasonal crops into perennial crops that regrow after being harvested and deliver multiple yields before dying.

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Las Clínicas de Plantas participaran en la conmemoración del 32º “Día de la Investigación Agraria” en Perú

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El doctor de plantas Armando Valencia le explica al público presente la metodología que utiliza cuando realiza una clínica de plantas

El 14 de julio se llevó a cabo el 32º “Día de la Investigación Agraria” celebrado por el Instituto Nacional de Innovación Agraria (INIA) de Perú. El evento conmemora la importancia que tiene la investigación y el desarrollo de tecnologías en el área agrícola en el país. En este evento se reconoce el aporte que personas distinguidas han hecho a la investigación y a la agricultura durante su carrera profesional.

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Plantwise Pest Alerts – free email subscription service

Are you interested in keeping up to date with crop pest and disease literature reports? You’re invited to sign up to our monthly pest alert email containing links to recently published scientific literature from around the globe.

On sign up, select which country or region you are interested in, or the Worldwide regional option. Feel free to sign up more than once if you would like to receive reports on multiple countries or regions.

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The Life Cycle of Fall Armyworm

Fall armyworm life cycleThe Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda, is a major invasive pest in Africa. It has a voracious appetite and feeds on more than 80 plant species, including maize, rice, sorghum and sugarcane. Another feature which makes it an incredibly successful invasive species is its ability to spread and reproduce quickly. CABI have developed a poster to show the life cycle of the Fall armyworm, which includes egg, 6 growth stages of caterpillar development (instars), pupa and adult moth. Click here to view the full poster, or read about the life cycle below.  Continue reading

CABI scientists shed light on factors affecting the use of biological control

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A parasitic wasp foraging for eggs on the underside of a leaf. Photo: CABI

Human health issues arising from the use of synthetic pesticides and concerns about their environmental toxicity are making lower-risk alternatives increasingly attractive. Biological control agents are living organisms which reduce harmful pest populations. Many people know of the common ladybird, whose larvae feed on aphids, but a wide range or biological control agents – e.g. predatory and parasitic insects, diseases of plant pests – are available. However, their use is still limited, in particular in low- and lower-middle-income countries.

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Citrus greening detected in Trinidad

Fruit affected by Huanglongbing
Fruit affected by Huanglongbing (USDA)

Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Citrus greening, has been confirmed in Trinidad for the first time. The disease, which was detected on leaves from a lime tree in the north of the island, can cause devastating yield loss for Citrus growers and is regarded as one of the most important threats to global commercial and sustainable citrus production.  Continue reading

Removal of invasive shrub could be an easy way to help reduce malaria transmission

Prosopis juliflora
Prosopis juliflora. Photo:
Muller et al., Malaria Journal, 2017’

Removing the flowers of an invasive shrub from mosquito-prone areas might be a simple way to help reduce malaria transmission, according to a new study published in the open access Malaria Journal. Removing the flowers from villages in Mali decreased the local mosquito vector population by nearly 60%.

The study, carried out in the Bandiagra District in Mali, is the first of its kind to trial a direct environmental manipulation as a way to control mosquito vector populations in areas at risk of malaria transmission.

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