Citrus Greening in Grenada

Citrus Greening, also known as Huanglongbing, was first confirmed in Grenada in 2016. The disease is caused by bacteria which are spread by the Citrus psyllid. The disease causes yellow blotchy mottling on leaves, small lopsided fruit and branch dieback, making the tree uneconomical. Due to Citrus greening’s potential to devastate Citrus yields, Grenada’s Ministry of Agriculture has launched a campaign to control the disease, which has been detected in almost every area of the island. In the video above, Thaddeus Peters, Agricultural Officer for the MoA’s Pest Management Unit, explains the importance and methods of controlling Citrus Greening.  Continue reading

Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle on Guam – an update

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An adult male coconut rhinoceros beetle. Emmy Engasser, Hawaiian Scarab ID, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org

10 years ago the Coconut Rhinoceros beetle (CRB) was first discovered on the western Pacific island of Guam. Since then, these shoe-shine black, miniature invaders have spread to all parts of the island and are laying waste to the local coconut and oil palm population. The economy, culture and ecology  of Guam and other Pacific islands are intrinsically linked to the native palm species such that the rhino beetle poses a major threat. The indigenous peoples of Guam have a long history of weaving palm fronds, an artistry that is now at risk due to the rhino beetle. These trees are a symbol of tropic paradise, a motif that drives Guam’s primary industry; tourism. Continue reading

Fall armyworm could cost Africa $2bn+ in lost harvest

DJHggJ4WsAAzkwI (1)Last week, CABI confirmed that since it arrived in Africa in 2016, the Fall Armyworm (FAW) has been reported in 28 African countries, presenting a now permanent agricultural challenge for the continent. FAW mainly affects maize and can cut yields by up to 60%. In research funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), CABI estimate that, if not properly managed, the pest will cost 10 of Africa’s major maize producing economies a total of $2.2bn to $5.5bn a year in lost maize harvests.

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E-plant clinics pilot launched in Bangladesh

Plantwise programme was launched in Bangladesh with Plant Protection Wing (PPW), Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE) in 2015 after signing MOU with Ministry of Agriculture and Economic Relations Division of Ministry of Finance. The programme initially started with establishment of 10 plant clinics in 5 districts and is gradually scaled up to 30 plant clinics in 10 districts now.  24 July marked the launch of e plant clinics pilot in Bangladesh with the training of 10 plant doctors. In order to ensure smooth data flow from plant clinics and test new innovative ICT technologies in the ongoing plant clinic approach, tablets were distributed to the plant doctors for data collection. The program was inaugurated by Dr Amitav Das, Director (PPW), Md. Rezaul Islam, Deputy Director (IPM) and Arefur Rahaman (PPW) by distributing tablets to the participants.  10 active plant doctors who were regularly recording and submitting clinic data were chosen for this e plant clinic training.

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INIA y Plantwise desarrollan entrenamiento en uso seguro de plaguicidas

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Estacion 4 (calibración) durante la demostracion a lo largo del día de campaña en Concepción, Junín.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

La agricultura en el Perú se ha expandido rápidamente desde el 2000. Según el Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informatica del Perú, el Producto Bruto Interno agrícola se ha más que duplicado entre 2000-2016. Este crecimiento estuvo relacionado a la ocupación de nuevas áreas agrícolas, pero aún por la diseminación de tecnología. El rápido acceso a insumos igualmente ha expuesto a los agricultores a intoxicación debido a una mala utilización de los mismos. Según el Ministerio de Salud, los casos anuales de notificación de intoxicación aguda por plaguicidas sobrepasa los 2000 indivíduos, siendo un 80% causado por exposición laboral. Este número no considera los casos de intoxicación crónica, por lo que el problema puede ser aún más grave.

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How ICTs are key to Plantwise’s sustainability

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Tablets being used at a Plantwise plant clinic in India. Photo: CABI

The Plantwise programme has expanded in terms of its plant clinic network, the number of countries involved and the number of farmers reached since its launch in 2011. This expansion has been facilitated to a significant extent by an ICT infrastructure, i.e. the Knowledge Bank and e-plant clinics (plant clinics equipped with tablets). Mozambique, Nepal, Malawi, Nicaragua and Jamaica are piloting e-plant clinics this year and more countries are showing increasing interest. The programme has overcome various obstacles and the advantages, both practical and data-based, are now being seen at a variety of locations.

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Side event on fall armyworm at AGRF 2017 [livestream]

In 2016 the fall armyworm, a major pest in the Americas, was found in Africa for the first time. Since then it has rapidly spread across much of sub-Saharan Africa. The caterpillar feeds on more than 80 different plants, but maize is its preferred host, the most widely grown crop in Africa and a staple for half the continent. In the context of Africa’s climate, the insect is now likely to build permanent and significant populations in West, Central and Southern Africa, and spread to other regions when temperatures are favourable, posing a major threat to food security.

CABI and AGRA are hosting a side event on fall armyworm at the African Green Revolution Forum 2017 in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. If you are not attending the conference, you can watch the livesteam below on September 7 at 14:00 (UTC). The video will also be available after the event.

[Update 14:20]: Due to poor internet connectivity, we are unable to run the livestream. A video will be made available on this page after the event.

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