Swapping Pesticides with Beetles Could Put Money in Farmers’ Pockets

By Wei Zhang. Reblogged from Agrilinks.

34096134693_27bfc1e954_bEvery time you see a ladybug—also known as the ladybird beetle—you should tuck it in your wallet as a lucky charm to bring prosperity, according to the folklore of many countries. There’s a grain of truth in the old stories. Research shows that each ladybird in a cotton field in the North China Plain provides an economic benefit to farmers of at least 0.05 yuan, or one U.S. cent. This may not sound like much, but consider: Doubling the current ladybird density in two-thirds of Chinese cotton fields could bring farmers around $300 million per year.

Continue reading

The future for coastal farmers in Bangladesh

aerial-asia-beach-584302
Roughly 40 million people in Bangladesh depend on coastal areas for agriculture and is the most important livelihood option (© Pexels)

A recent study published in Nature Climate Change has suggested that the future global effects of climate change will impact the livelihoods of over 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh as sea levels rise. Flooding of saltwater is already negatively impacting coastal residents in the country as soil conditions alter, causing farmers to either change from historic rice farming to aquaculture or to relocate further inland to avoid such salinity changes.

Continue reading

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (05 November 18)

animal-beetle-bug-1131163
This month’s pest alerts include a report on 8 new species of weevil (Curculionidae) in Saudi Arabia (© Pexels)

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include the first report of Trochoideus desjardinsi in Cuba. 8 new records of Curculionidae in Saudi Arabia and 3 new species of aphids in China. Continue reading

One health – human, animal, environmental and plant health

Do you give advice on poultry SD

Ahead of One Health Day on 3rd November 2018, Robert Taylor, CABI’s Editorial Director, explores the relationships between human, animal, environmental and plant health…

The ‘One Health’ initiative launched in 2007 was designed primarily to break down the barriers between human and veterinary medicine, particularly for dealing with zoonotic diseases. The link between BSE and nvCJD, as well as the threat of new diseases like SARS and threat of old diseases like avian influenza made for a strong case that the health of humans and animals are inter-linked. Since then, ‘One Health’ has been expanded to include environmental health as there are many examples of how human activity can harm the health of the environment, and how in turn, a polluted environment adversely affects human health.

Continue reading

Más allá del conocimiento: Estrategias para frenar el daño del gorgojo de los Andes en Perú

Por Fernando Escobal Valencia, Doctor de Plantas – INIA-Plantwise, Cajamarca –  Perú

Sesión Experiencias MIP Gorgojo de los Andes

El caserío Secsemayo pertenece al Centro Poblado Chamis, distrito Cajamarca, en la región Cajamarca; está ubicado a 20 kilómetros en dirección al sur – oeste de la ciudad capital, geográficamente enclavado en los andes cajamarquinos a 3,200 m.s.n.m.; bajo estas condiciones, la papa es el principal cultivo, cuya producción se destina íntegramente al consumo y seguridad alimentaria de aproximadamente 150 familias rurales.

Continue reading

Cultivating more women leaders in Plantwise Pakistan

anumpic2

It was such a pleasure to talk to Noureen Anum (Anum) over video call from across the border in India and hearing about her experiences and role in Plantwise. She is an agricultural officer in Taxila, a small Tehsil near Rawalpandi District in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Taxila has long been known for its universities empowering many with knowledge and information. Anum has been working in the extension service for the last two and a half years and was trained as Plantwise master trainer in 2017. Since then she has not only been training more master trainers to scale up trainings but is also continues to work with farmers as a plant doctor.

Continue reading