Update: New Pest & Disease Records (27 Jul 16)

Rhizoctonia on common wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Rhizoctonia on common wheat (Triticum aestivum) © Mary Burrows, Montana State University, Bugwood.org

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include the first report of Rhizoctonia oryzae causing crown and root rot on wheat in Chile, a survey of nematodes associated with fruit trees in the state of Amapá, Brazil and the first report of Ramulispora sorghi, a new pathogen of sorghum in NE Argentina.

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Cassava viruses threaten food security

Written by Joao Junior, Plantwise Knowledge Bank Intern.

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Cassava farmer. Copyright CABI.

Known as the poor people’s crop, cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important subsistence crops in Africa, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and West Africa being consumed fresh, cooked or processed. It is estimated that cassava contributes to nearly 40% of the total daily calories consumed by poor smallholders in marginal and sub-marginal areas. The significant contribution to daily calories is due to its efficient production and storage of starch on the roots.

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“Pest-smart” to climate-smart in Southeast Asia

By Amy Cruz. Reblogged from the CGIAR CCAFS blog.

Male farmers listen to the facilitator during a focus group discussion in the Tra Hat Climate-Smart Village. The discussions help the researchers understand the pest management and climate change perceptions of rice farmers. Photo: A. Sivapragasam (CABI)

Climate-smart agriculture calls for pest management that controls farm pests and diseases in a way that does not negatively affect ecosystem services and human health.

Climate change affects not only farming practices in that extreme events may flatten trees and crops. It also affects the distributions and life cycles of animals and insects such as pests, disease-causing organisms and crop-pollinating insects and animals. Farmers in Vietnam speculate that the increase in temperatures brought about by climate change might be favouring certain pests.

To further understand the behavior, control and management of pests and diseases in the light of climate change, the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) Southeast Asia is conducting “Pest Smart”, a two-year initiative under the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Southeast Asia (CCAFS SEA) Climate-Smart Villages (CSVs) project.

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Update: New Pest & Disease Records (13 Jul 16)

Naga King chilis in India are being attacked by invasive mealybugs  © Asit K. Ghosh
Naga King chilis in India are being attacked by invasive mealybugs © Asit K. Ghosh

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include new host records for the fruit fly Ceratitis capitata in the state of Pará, Brazil, the presence of Meloidogyne enterolobii on Jalapeño pepper in Sinaloa, Mexico and the first report of the invasive mealybug Phenacoccus parvus infesting Naga King chili in India.

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Plant doctors to the rescue in integrated pest management

By Dyna Eam. Reblogged from the CGIAR CCAFS blog.

Farmer representatives and project team members of Rohal Suong Climate-Smart Village in Cambodia learn about rice pest management in light of climate change.

Many people attribute floods, droughts and cyclones to climate change and these natural disasters impact greatly on agricultural productivity. But recent scientific evidences show that pests are getting a boost from climate change. The increasing temperature and erratic rainfall cause pests and diseases to thrive and infest crops in wider ranges of places globally.

Read the full article on the CGIAR CCAFS blog →

Surveillance critical to halting deadly tomato pest

By Jackie Opara. Reblogged from SciDev.Net

tuta
© Marja van der Straten/NVWA Plant Protection Service/Bugwood – CC BY-NC 3.0 US

Effective surveillance and integrated pest management could curb the devastating impacts of tomato pest, Tuta absoluta, also called tomato leaf miner, which is ravaging the crop in Nigeria, experts say.

T. absoluta has affected most parts of northern Nigeria tomato farms in Kaduna state, causing a loss of more than 1 billion naira (about US$3.5 million), leading to rising tomato prices, according to the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (CABI) — an organisation working with African governments and research institutions to monitor the spread of the pest.

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Clínica de plantas atendió en el Día Nacional de Protección de los Cítricos en Santa Cruz, Bolivia

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Puesto de productores de cítricos en la feria. Fotografía de José Gómez

El sábado 18 de junio, se llevó a cabo el Día Nacional de Protección de los Cítricos. Esta actividad fue organizada por el Ministerio de Desarrollo Rural y Tierras, y se realizó en todos los departamentos del país. El Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Agropecuaria e Inocuidad Alimentaria (SENASAG), la Gobernación de Santa Cruz y la Asociación de Productores de Frutas se encargaron de realizar esta actividad en el Parque Urbano de Santa Cruz de la Sierra. La actividad contó con la presencia de empresas productoras y procesadoras de cítricos, empresas de insumos agrícolas, productores de zonas aledañas, y entidades del gobierno regional y nacional.

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