Space-age technology for fight against crop-devastating pest outbreaks

Space-age technology for fight against crop-devastating pest outbreaksLast night, the Pest Risk Information Service (PRISE), which uses state-of-the-art technology to help inform farmers in sub-Saharan Africa of pest outbreaks, was launched in Zambia at the British High Commission in Lusaka. The service is being developed by a consortium led by CABI and is funded by the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme (IPP).

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E-plant clinics launched in Mozambique

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E-plant clinic in Inhambane Province, Mozambique (© CABI)

E-plant clinics have been successfully launched in Mozambique this November, following two trainings and official launches. The trainings took place in a village called Tenga, Moamba near the capital city of Maputo (around 80 km), and in Morrumbene District near the city of Inhambane.

Training was delivered in partnership with the National Directorate of Agricultural Extension (DNEA), an institution of the Ministry of Agriculture in Mozambique.

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Integrated crop management Masters course yields success

Integrated crop management Masters course yields success

A graduation ceremony held on 17 November 2017 in Engelberg, Switzerland, celebrated the successful completion of the 2017 Masters of Advanced Studies in Integrated Crop Management (MAS in ICM) programme by a number of international students.

Coordinated by CABI and the University of Neuchâtel, the MAS in ICM programme provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the principles of good crop management, with an emphasis on productivity and environmental sustainability.

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9 ways to get climate-smart agriculture to more people

CIAT blog

This is the final post as part of our Climate Smart Agriculture Week (20 – 24 November 2017)

Understanding which agricultural practices work best, and where, to halt the impacts of climate change is one thing. But making sure those practices are adopted by communities – farmers, decision and policy makers – is another thing.

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Local innovation as source of adaptation and resilience to climate change

Women harvesting Moringa leaves in Réo, Burkina Faso
Women harvesting Moringa leaves, Burkina Faso. Photo credit: Pierre-François Pret

This is the second guest post as part of our Climate Smart Agriculture Week (20 – 24 November 2017)

Climate change poses major challenges to small-scale African farmers, whose own locally developed strategies to address these challenges provide entry points to sustainable processes of adapting to climate change. Partners in Prolinnova – a global network for promoting local innovation in ecological agriculture and natural resource management – have studied how crop farmers respond creatively to change.

Some case studies from West and Central Africa provide some insight:

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Blame animals only when you aren’t smart

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Photo credit: Mahesh Chander

This is the first guest post as part of our Climate Smart Agriculture Week (20 – 24 November 2017)

Despite us humans being the most intelligent among all living organisms it seems we have lowered ourselves to blaming the animals we farm for major environmental concerns, including; climate change, water depletion and pollution, land degradation and soil erosion, deforestation, threats to biodiversity and impacts of excessive material and energy use. Should they be held responsible?

The FAO says livestock is a major threat to environment, yet I would say, this is only the case because people are not smart enough to make livestock rearing and agriculture climate smart. We are the culprits.

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The disease that could change how we drink coffee

Hands-holding-coffee
Hands holding coffee (© Public Domain CCO)

Reblogged from BBC Future
Written by Jose Luis Penarredonda

If you landed in Bogota in the 1960s, one of the first things you would have probably seen outside the airport was a giant billboard. In a slightly menacing tone, it said: “Coffee rust is the enemy. Don’t bring plant materials from abroad”.

It was one of the first warnings about a foe that has been threatening Colombia’s coffee trade ever since.

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