Mango production in Bangladesh

20157800221According to the Daily Star, mango production in Rajshahi and Chapainawabganj districts in Bangladesh might be hampered by unfavourable weather this year. The farmers are worried as large numbers of fruits, up to 70%, fell from the trees before ripening. Following the attack by leaf hoppers earlier in March, mango trees in that area are now affected by an undiagnosed disease which has symptoms described as mould on leaves. This unconfirmed disease could potentially be caused by powdery mildew (Oidium mangiferae), but reliable pathogen diagnosis is needed before advising management strategies.

For advice on how to prevent and manage mango pests and diseases, such as powdery mildew, anthracnose and mango seed weevil, review the Green Lists hosted on the Plantwise knowledge bank providing cultural and biological management options.

The Green Lists are produced by Plantwise for use by plant doctors and extension workers who provide advice to farmers. To see more about the content held on the Plantwise knowledge bank, please click here.

Update: Plant Health News (20 May 15)

One of the illustrations from the pesticide safety guide produced by FAO and ILO (Image: Julien Batandéo)

One of the illustrations from the pesticide safety guide produced by FAO and ILO (Image: Julien Batandéo)

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including a model for sustainable onion production in India, a new training guide produced by FAO and ILO to protect children form the harmful effects of pesticides and a Chinese agricultural technology company providing support to improve food production in Tanzania.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
Read more of this post

Mobile phone app for Agricultural video animations

546a187544db8Scientific Animations without Borders (SAWBO) has released a mobile app for viewing their videos on agrilcuture, health and women’s empowerment.

SAWBO has developed more than 30 different 2D and 3D animations with voice-overs in over 50 different (majority African) languages. They have now released a mobile app that is available for any compatible Android device. Download the app in the Google Play market to access the entire library of animations. You can then download as many videos as you want, and share them with anyone through bluetooth.

SAWBO is a University of Illinois-based programme. They work in three main areas: agriculture, health and women’s empowerment. They transform extension information into animations, which are then voice overlaid into a range of languages from around the world. All SAWBO animations are made freely available to anyone wishing to use them for educational purposes. Animations can be downloaded from SAWBO channels and used on computers, tablets, cell phones, TVs, and overhead projection systems.

Agricultural videos include “Biocontrol of legume pod borer (Maruca vitrata)”, “Natural insecticide from neem seeds” and a number of videos on preventing postharvest loss.

Read more of this post

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (15 May 15)

Leafhoppers can cause direct damage and transmit disease © Piotrt, via WIkimedia

Leafhoppers can cause direct damage and transmit disease © Piotrt, via WIkimedia

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include Lonchaeidae associated with the genus Annona in Mexico, the first report of choanephora rot of okra in Korea and a review of Chinese species of the leafhopper genus Scaphoidella with description of a new species. 

Read more of this post

Plantwise opens at Milan Expo 2015

IMG_6075

A new exhibit by Plantwise launches at Milan Expo 2015 for this year’s theme ‘Feeding the planet: Energy for life.’ Take a look at the story from the beginning as word of the exhibit builds on social media up to launch day on site in Milan. Can’t make it to Expo this year? Play along at home by downloading the Plant Doctor Game today. Read more.

Integrated Crop Management Masters students with CABI Switzerland sharing visions for a sustainable agriculture

Contributed by Melanie Bateman, CABI Switzerland

In March of this year, 11 students from 10 different countries journeyed to CABI’s Centre in Switzerland and embarked on a Masters of Advanced Studies in Integrated Crop Management (ICM). ICM is a sustainable approach to farming which promotes practices that are economically-viable and that integrate the needs of the environment.

This week, the MAS ICM students join world-renowend experts for a symposium on Visions for a Sustainable Agriculture. The students will take to the floor to present on the challenges and priority areas for action in their home countries. Other presenters on the agenda include representatives of industry; research institutions such as the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture (FiBL); universities such as the University of Southampton and the Sustainable Agroecosystems Group at the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich. Plantwise will also be featured among the topics under discussion as an example of a means for providing farmers with advice on sustainable farming practices. Plantwise is a topic which is close to the hearts of some of the students as many of them are very active in the Plantwise programmes in their home countries.

MAS in ICM class 2015 CABI Switzerland

Master student of the classe 2015 in Intergrated Crop Management (ICM) with CABI Switzerland. Many of them are very active in the Plantwise programmes in their home countries.

Update: Plant Health News (06 May 15)

Ecuador plans to improve traceability of its products from field to market. Photo by Vilseskogen/Chris Yardin, via Flickr

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including the encouragement of citizen cooperation in the fight against fruit flies in Chile, exciting new projects to improve agriculture in Ecuador and an update from IITA on the spread of papaya mealybug in Tanzania.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,834 other followers