Citrus greening detected in Trinidad

Fruit affected by Huanglongbing
Fruit affected by Huanglongbing (USDA)

Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Citrus greening, has been confirmed in Trinidad for the first time. The disease, which was detected on leaves from a lime tree in the north of the island, can cause devastating yield loss for Citrus growers and is regarded as one of the most important threats to global commercial and sustainable citrus production.  Continue reading

Anti-Terror Measures Allow Pest Explosion

Since 9/11 the number of invasive pests and plant diseases managing to slip into the USA has risen dramatically. Border checkpoints normally act as a first line of defence against these pests and diseases, however the increased emphasis on anti-terrorism measures has led to agricultural issues being ignored. This costs the USA a staggering $120 billion (approximately £75 billion) per year and is threatening some of the country’s most productive agricultural regions.

Homeland Security checking food imports (Eric Risberg/AP)

The increase in the number of invasive pests and plant diseases was triggered by an increased focus on anti-terrorism measures at the expense of agricultural protection. The biggest problem was the reassignment of hundreds of agricultural scientists to the newly-formed Homeland Security department after 9/11. This meant that instead of stopping invasive species at the border they were now involved in anti-terrorism duties. Many of the scientists resigned or retired and those that remained were replaced in the chain of command by officials with little knowledge of agricultural science.

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Is citrus greening coming your way?

Mexico is the latest to succumb to the inevitable spread and establishment of huanglongbing (HLB) – the devastating disease of citrus crops. Mexican authorities in the states of Jalisco, Michoacán and Colima have warned growers that HLB – otherwise known as citrus greening – is here to stay.

HLB was first detected in Mexico in July 2009 and it’s clear now that it won’t be going away. Some estimates suggest HLB could affect 60% of Mexico’s citrus industry, an industry which provides employment for 70,000 farmers. SENASICA, the National Service for Animal and Plant Health, Food Safety and Quality, has invested over US$20 million to control the disease. An economic impact assessment report prepared this year by consultants specializing in the economics and finance of plant health programmes indicated total losses to the Mexican economy could amount to almost $7000 million.

Mexico’s not the first to report the alarming consequences of HLB infection. The disease has been known in Brazil for some years and is spreading throughout the region. Florida first reported the disease over 5 years ago and data from 2010 showed 18% of trees in Florida are infected – for more information on the disease in Florida click here. HLB was first reported in Nicaragua and Honduras in 2010 and in Costa Rica in February this year. A recent outbreak in the Dominican Republic is said to have destroyed 34,000 trees and left 5000 unemployed.
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California on alert against citrus psyllid

 The detection of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in a citrus grove in Ventura County, California, has set alarm bells ringing in the Californian citrus industry, and led to the imposition of a quarantine in the County just as the citrus harvest was getting under way. The psyllid, now found throughout Florida and present in a number of other U.S. states, is a serious pest of citrus, and is the primary vector for citrus greening (also called Huanglongbing or HLB), one of the more serious diseases of these fruit crops. All citrus and closely related species are susceptible hosts for both the insect and the disease, and there is no cure once a tree is infected with HLB.

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