Black Rot Disease Hits Uganda

A photograph of a cabbage leaf showing symptoms of black rot. Image by USDA Forest Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY 3.0)
A photograph of a cabbage leaf showing symptoms of black rot. Image by USDA Forest Service via Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY 3.0)

Vegetable farmers in the Kayunga and Mukono districts of Uganda are reporting crop losses due to black rot disease. One farmer, Twaha Kahooza of Kyampisi village, Kayunga Sub-county, says he had planted four acres of cabbages and was expecting about Shs18m (about £4,500 or US$7,000) from the harvest, however he only managed to get Shs5m (about £1,200 or US$2,000).

Black rot is caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris and is one of the most destructive diseases of cabbage and other crucifers such as  broccoli, brussels sprouts, Chinese cabbage, collards, kohlrabi and mustard. The disease is usually most prevalent in low lying areas where plants remain wet for long periods. The disease is characterized by a yellow V-shaped lesion at the leaf margin which turns brown as the leaf area expands. The disease can also affect seedlings and can enter the plant through insect feeding or injury to the plant. Management of black rot in crucifers includes obtaining certified, pathogen free seed, ensuring there is enough space between plants and crop rotation.To read more about black rot and black rot management visit factsheets on the Plantwise Knowledge Bank.  

To read a Plantwise Factsheet for Farmers written in Uganda click here. 

To find out more about Plantwise plant clinics running in Uganda, click here

References:

‘Farmers count losses over black rot disease in cabbage’, Fred Muzaale, April 2013, Daily Monitor 

Farming in Afghanistan – how plant clinics can help farmers

by Muhammad Faheem, CABI Country Coordinator for Afghanistan, and Julien Lamontagne-Godwin, Plantwise Coordinator

Afghan farmer looking for armyworms
Mohammed Rauf looking at his cabbage crop to ensure no armyworms are present. Credit: Muhammad Faheem © CABI

Mohammed Rauf is living in the Afghani province of Bamyan, to the west of the capital Kabul. His village is called Dahene Nargis in the Punjab District. Bamyan Province is an agricultural hotspot in Afghanistan. Apple, potato and wheat are the major crops. Plant clinics have been operating in Bamyan Province since May 2012, supported by the Agha Khan Foundation, the Afghan Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) and the Plantwise initiative of CABI. The plant clinics are operating in 7 districts of the Bamyan and Parwan provinces and help farmers obtain information on the pests and diseases affecting their crops. Continue reading