The 2014 Global Hunger Index and how Plantwise countries are faring

2014 Global Hunger Index by Severity

2014 Global Hunger Index by Severity

The 2014 Global Hunger Index, now available from the International Food Policy Research Institute, Welthungerhilfe, and Concern Worldwide, shows a steady decrease in hunger in most developing countries. Read more of this post

Backstopping visit to Bangkok, Thailand

As the last part of our data management trip, Claire and I headed to Bangkok for the 11th and 12th of September. We joined a group of plant doctors and farmers at the plant clinic/rally in Nong Kung village, Suppaya district, Chainat province. We saw a demonstration on biocontrol, looked through pamphlets and information available to farmers about crop problems, and discussed the rice harvest which was currently taking place. In the backstopping training at the Rice Department, the participants shared their concerns and plans for future data management in Thailand.

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Participants of the data management backstopping in Bangkok. ©CABI

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Farmers attending the clinic to listen to advice about crop protection. ©CABI

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Emily, Claire, Fook Wing, and Siva observing how plant clinics operate in Chainat province. ©CABI

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Discussing data management in Thailand. ©CABI

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Looking forward to a delicious meal in Nong Kung village! ©CABI

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Farmers learning about biocontrol products using fungal spores grown on a culture of cooked rice. ©CABI

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A farmer and plant doctor discussing issues with food crops. ©CABI

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Preserved samples and specimens for comparison purposes when diagnosing crop problems. ©CABI

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View from the plant clinic into part of the village – it was a beautiful, sunny day. ©CABI

Data management training in Phnom Penh, Cambodia – looking back on a successful trip!

In the first week of September, 2014, Claire Beverley and I went to Cambodia for three days to run data management training and a cluster meeting, along with our colleague Jeremy Ngim from the CABI Malaysia office. The presentations were given in English and translated into Khmer, which was a neat experience for all. We got the opportunity to talk with plant doctors and their supervisors about current issues with data management in Cambodia, and how harmonising, analysing, and sharing of data can work within Cambodia.

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The General Directorate of Agriculture in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. ©CABI

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One of the translators, Ho Chea, patiently getting materials ready for a harmonisation exercise. ©CABI

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Participants listening enthusiastically to Claire presenting. ©CABI

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Birds of Paradise at lunch break. ©CABI

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Participants discussing ways issues and solutions with data flow in Cambodia. ©CABI

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Claire working with one of the translators, Sarika, to facilitate a discussion in both English and Khmer! ©CABI

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Emily, happy to be talking about data! ©CABI

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Claire and Emily exploring Phnom Penh in a tuk-tuk. ©CABI

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Delicious snacks at tea – can you name the fruits in this picture? ©CABI

 

 

Alternative to fungicides for the control of Pecan scab

Symptoms of pecan scab on pecan fruit © Charles J. Graham

Symptoms of pecan scab on pecan fruit © Charles J. Graham

Pecan scab, caused by the fungus Fusicladium effusum, is a major yield-limiting disease of pecan (Carya illinoinensis). Planting varieties with some resistance to the disease is the most practical way to avoid losses from pecan scab, but the scab fungus can change over time to overcome host resistance. The use of chemical fungicides is another widely used method of prevention and control. However, increasing resistance of the scab fungus to fungicides, coupled with greater awareness of the environmental impact of chemicals, is prompting farmers to consider other management options.

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Elaborando recomendaciones sobre plagas en Costa Rica

Ana María Solano Guevara elaborando una Lista Verde y Amarilla (Léna Durocher-Granger)

Ana María Solano Guevara elaborando una Lista Verde y Amarilla (Léna Durocher-Granger, CABI)

English summary follows

Costa Rica es uno de los últimos países que se agregó en la metodología de Plantwise. Del 10 al 12 de setiembre 2014, se realizó en San José un taller para la elaboración de Guías de manejo de plagas que se llaman “Listas Verde y Amarilla”. Los participantes eran expertos en entomología, fitopatología y acarología así como extensionistas agrícolas de diferentes instituciones (universidades públicas, Ministerio de Agricultura y Ganadería, institutos de investigación) y regiones del país. Los participantes aprendieron a elaborar consejos claros y precisos sobre algunas de las plagas más importantes para los productores y productoras en Costa Rica. Estas Listas Verde y Amarilla producidas durante el taller estarán disponibles en el Banco de Conocimientos para consulta y distribución a los productores y productoras a través de los Doctores de plantas.

Ana María Solano Guevara, ingeniera agrónoma y estudiante de maestría de la Universidad de Costa Rica contribuyó al taller con su experiencia en la disciplina de la Acarología. Ana María nos cuenta como el taller la benefició para su trabajo diario:

“El curso que impartieron me pareció de gran utilidad para el aprendizaje sobre bases de datos novedosas y actualizadas para la consulta sobre información de plagas en los cultivos, además, sobre medidas de combate químico, lo cual, muchas veces es en lo que se incurre en errores de uso así como de recomendación técnica.

Además, el tener nuevos contactos y retroalimentación con colegas del área, amplía más los conocimientos.

Me será de utilidad este aprendizaje recibido por ustedes para contribuir en mejor medida al diagnóstico de muestras en el Laboratorio de Acarología, así como de difundir la información a los estudiantes de agronomía de la universidad.

Considero que como se ha manejado el curso, se realizó de manera adecuada; se difundió información y se crearon productos como las Listas Verde y Amarillas de algunas plagas.

Les agradezco sinceramente el tiempo dedicado, la preparación así como su disponibilidad y atención en la clase y en las preguntas que teníamos como participantes.”

Para más información sobre las clínicas de plantas en su región consulte la página de Plantwise o si tiene consulta, manda un mensaje a plantwise@cabi.org

 From September 10th to 12th, a workshop in San José was given to participants from different institutions and regions around Costa Rica. Experts in entomology, plant pathology and acarology learned how to create Pest Management Decision Guides, called Green & Yellow Lists. Ana María Solano Guevara, agronomist and M.Sc. student at the University of Costa Rica, explained how the workshop will impact her work in the future: “The course given was useful for learning new innovative and updated databases on pests and crops, as well on chemical control measures. Moreover, having new contacts and feedback from colleagues broadens your knowledge. This learning will be useful for me to contribute to give better diagnosis of samples in the Acarology Laboratory, as well as to disseminate information to agronomy students at the University.”

 

Update: Plant Health News (30 Jul 14)

Farmers in California are diverting water away from vegetable crops to rescue their almond crops from drought © Luigi Chiesa (CC BY-SA)

Californian farmers are diverting water from vegetable crops to save almonds from drought © Luigi Chiesa (CC BY-SA)

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including the effects of typhoons in Taiwan and China, a new strategy for almond irrigation in California and a crackdown on fake seed sellers in Kenya.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
Read more of this post

Managing plant pathogens by enhancing ecosystem services

 

Pollination, an example of an ecosystem service  © Reinhold Stansich

Pollination, an example of an ecosystem service © Reinhold Stansich

From the 8th-12th April experts met in Bellagio, Italy to develop a strategy to mitigate the effects emerging plant diseases are having on crops in sub-Saharan Africa. Among these experts were Plantwise staff. A major theme throughout the conference was ecosystem services and how agricultural biodiversity can enhance the provision of these services, creating resilient agro-ecosystems.

Click on the link below to read more about the conference:

Bellagio Center conference on dangerous plant pathogens

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