Bolivia: control de la mosca de la fruta en chirimoya

La mosca de la fruta es una plaga de mayor importancia en América latina, y solo en Bolivia, esta plaga causa pérdida de 113 millones de dólares cada año a los productores de frutas y hortalizas.

Los productores y productoras de chirimoya pueden revisar la Lista Verde producida por Plantwise que brinda asesoramiento sobre la prevención y el manejo cultural y biológico de la mosca de la fruta para evitar pérdidas importantes de sus cosechas.

Algunas medidas para el control de la mosca incluyen el manejo de malezas, recolección de frutos caídos, adelantar la cosecha, colocar trampas de feromonas y el uso de enemigos naturales ya como Beauveria bassiana.

Para más información sobre el control de plagas, visite Plantwise knowledge bank.chirimoya

Update: Plant Health News (04 Nov 15)

Coconut rhinoceros beetles have been discovered breeding in the tree tops of coconut in Guam. Photo:  john_amend_all2000
Coconut rhinoceros beetles have been discovered breeding in the tree tops of coconut in Guam. Photo: john_amend_all2000

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including huge losses in Bolivia caused by fruit flies, arboreal breeding behaviour of coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam and a new technology that could help distinguish the European corn borer from other look-alike species.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
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Factsheet of the month: November 2015 – Using natural nematicide plants against banana nematodes

20157800105Researchers at Queen’s University, Belfast, have developed a new method to control the parasitic nematodes that devastate banana crops and cause billions of dollars of crop losses annually. It is hoped that this new technology will reduce these losses, boosting the incomes of subsistence farmers in developing countries.

Nematodes are notoriously difficult to control, and the most effective management practices are preventative. Chemical control using nematicides is not recommended for the control of nematodes as these chemicals are often expensive and highly toxic to both humans and the environment.  Continue reading

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (28 Oct 15)

Bud midge damage on tomato (a-c), pepper (d) and Tahiti lime (e). Photo: Hernandez et al. CC BY
Bud midge damage on tomato(a-c), pepper(d) and Tahiti lime(e). Photo: Hernandez et al. CC BY

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include the isolation and molecular characterization of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, isolated from apple and pear orchards in Egypt, the characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India and the damage characteristics, potential distribution and new crop host of the bud midge Prodiplosis longifila in Colombia.

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Update: Plant Health News (21 Oct 15)

The Gene Stewardship Award was presented to 3 Kenyan scientists for their work in tackling the deadly wheat rust © IAEA Imagebank
The Gene Stewardship Award was presented to 3 Kenyan scientists for their work in tackling wheat rust © IAEA Imagebank

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including how technology could increase Citrus yields in Pakistan by 30%, what scientists in Kenya are doing to eliminate devastating wheat rust and a global maps of the gap between potential and actual yields of wheat and maize.

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International Day of Rural Women

Tea pickers in Sri Lanka. (Photo: Katherine Cameron, CABI)
Tea pickers in Sri Lanka. (Photo: Katherine Cameron, CABI)

Today, 15 October, is the International Day of Rural Women. The majority of rural women depend on natural resources and agriculture for their livelihoods. In developing countries, rural women represent approximately 43% of the agricultural labour force, and produce, process and prepare much of the food available, thereby giving them primary responsibility for food security.

Ensuring rural women’s access to reliable agricultural advice can make the difference between their crop succeeding or failing. CABI works alongside national extension services to deliver information to farmers in the field, through face to face plant clinics, voicemail/SMS messages, radio and magazines, through projects such as Plantwise (www.plantwise.org), Direct2Farm (www.cabi.org/direct2farm) and the Africa Soil Health Consortium (www.africasoilhealth.cabi.org).

The three women pictured above are tea pickers in Sri Lanka. Anyone who has visited tea growing countries will notice the large commercial tea farms, and women in the fields picking the tea leaves. Smallholders also contribute to tea production in Sri Lanka. Regulated by the Tea Smallholding Authority, they sell tea leaves from their 0.5-2 acre plots to the big tea companies. Tea blister blight is the main problem for tea farmers in Sri Lanka. In June, farmer Punchi brought a diseased tea leaf into the plant clinic in Nuwara Eliya. The plant doctor was able to diagnose blister blight and recommend how to manage the problem. Punchi left the clinic with a new hope that she could stop the disease from spreading and save the rest of her tea crop for selling to the tea companies.

You can find out more about blister blight by reading the Plantwise technical factsheet on tea blister blight.
Find out more about the International Day of Rural Women at http://www.un.org/en/events/ruralwomenday.

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (14 Oct 15)

Damage to banana roots, like this example caused by burrowing nematodes (Radopholus similis) have been studied in Ethiopia © Scot Nelson, CC BY-SA
Nematode damage on banana roots has been studied in Ethiopia © Scot Nelson, CC BY-SA

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include Nesidiocoris tenuis, a predatory species of the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta in Iran, the first report of Chickpea chlorotic dwarf virus infecting tomato crops in Pakistan and root necrosis assessment of plant parasitic nematodes of banana at Arbaminch, Ethiopia.

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