Plantwise Most Read 2018

photo: Sven Torfinn. Kenya, Nairobi, Machakos, October 2011. Plant Health Clinic during market day in the village near Machakos, 50 kilometers outside the capital Nairobi. Farmers visiting the market can come to see a plant doctor and show them samples of

With 2018 drawing to a close we take a look at the most popular articles on the Plantwise blog this year, along with some firm favourites.

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El Puesto para Plantas de Achuapa, Nicaragua ayuda a mantener la producción de ajonjolí

Por Solveig Danielsen, Luis Medina, Patricia Castillo y Eduardo Hidalgo

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El ajonjolí, principal actividad económica del municipio de Achuapa

El ajonjolí es un cultivo de mucha importancia socioeconómica para los pequeños productores de la franja del pacífico de Nicaragua. Desde principio de los años 90, la Cooperativa Juan Francisco Paz Silva produce y procesa ajonjolí para la exportación de aceite a Estados Unidos, Inglaterra y Japón.

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The Achuapa plant clinic helps to maintain sesame yields in Nicaragua

By Solveig Danielsen, Luis Medina, Patricia Castillo and Eduardo Hidalgo

nicasesameplant
Sesame, the main economic crop in Achuapa

Sesame is a crop of great socioeconomic importance for smallholder farmers of the pacific region of Nicaragua. Since the early 90s, the Juan Francisco Paz Silva Cooperative has produced sesame oil, mainly for export to the United States, England and Japan.

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Fighting hunger in West Africa with shrubs

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The African shrub Guiera senegalensis (© Marco Schmidt)

Improving food production in drought-prone, insecure areas of West Africa is a major challenge and concern for governments and their respective communities. A new crop management system incorporating the promotion of perennial shrubs may be a key potential solution to such problems.

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Swapping Pesticides with Beetles Could Put Money in Farmers’ Pockets

By Wei Zhang. Reblogged from Agrilinks.

34096134693_27bfc1e954_bEvery time you see a ladybug—also known as the ladybird beetle—you should tuck it in your wallet as a lucky charm to bring prosperity, according to the folklore of many countries. There’s a grain of truth in the old stories. Research shows that each ladybird in a cotton field in the North China Plain provides an economic benefit to farmers of at least 0.05 yuan, or one U.S. cent. This may not sound like much, but consider: Doubling the current ladybird density in two-thirds of Chinese cotton fields could bring farmers around $300 million per year.

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The future for coastal farmers in Bangladesh

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Roughly 40 million people in Bangladesh depend on coastal areas for agriculture and is the most important livelihood option (© Pexels)

A recent study published in Nature Climate Change has suggested that the future global effects of climate change will impact the livelihoods of over 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh as sea levels rise. Flooding of saltwater is already negatively impacting coastal residents in the country as soil conditions alter, causing farmers to either change from historic rice farming to aquaculture or to relocate further inland to avoid such salinity changes.

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Update: New Pest & Disease Records (05 November 18)

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This month’s pest alerts include a report on 8 new species of weevil (Curculionidae) in Saudi Arabia (© Pexels)

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include the first report of Trochoideus desjardinsi in Cuba. 8 new records of Curculionidae in Saudi Arabia and 3 new species of aphids in China. Continue reading