Mango production in Bangladesh

20157800221According to the Daily Star, mango production in Rajshahi and Chapainawabganj districts in Bangladesh might be hampered by unfavourable weather this year. The farmers are worried as large numbers of fruits, up to 70%, fell from the trees before ripening. Following the attack by leaf hoppers earlier in March, mango trees in that area are now affected by an undiagnosed disease which has symptoms described as mould on leaves. This unconfirmed disease could potentially be caused by powdery mildew (Oidium mangiferae), but reliable pathogen diagnosis is needed before advising management strategies.

For advice on how to prevent and manage mango pests and diseases, such as powdery mildew, anthracnose and mango seed weevil, review the Green Lists hosted on the Plantwise knowledge bank providing cultural and biological management options.

The Green Lists are produced by Plantwise for use by plant doctors and extension workers who provide advice to farmers. To see more about the content held on the Plantwise knowledge bank, please click here.

Update: Plant Health News (20 May 15)

One of the illustrations from the pesticide safety guide produced by FAO and ILO (Image: Julien Batandéo)

One of the illustrations from the pesticide safety guide produced by FAO and ILO (Image: Julien Batandéo)

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including a model for sustainable onion production in India, a new training guide produced by FAO and ILO to protect children form the harmful effects of pesticides and a Chinese agricultural technology company providing support to improve food production in Tanzania.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
Read more of this post

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (15 May 15)

Leafhoppers can cause direct damage and transmit disease © Piotrt, via WIkimedia

Leafhoppers can cause direct damage and transmit disease © Piotrt, via WIkimedia

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include Lonchaeidae associated with the genus Annona in Mexico, the first report of choanephora rot of okra in Korea and a review of Chinese species of the leafhopper genus Scaphoidella with description of a new species. 

Read more of this post

Update: Plant Health News (06 May 15)

Ecuador plans to improve traceability of its products from field to market. Photo by Vilseskogen/Chris Yardin, via Flickr

Here’s a taste of some of the latest stories about plant health, including the encouragement of citizen cooperation in the fight against fruit flies in Chile, exciting new projects to improve agriculture in Ecuador and an update from IITA on the spread of papaya mealybug in Tanzania.

Click on the link to read more of the latest plant health news!
Read more of this post

Which is the most important plant-pathogenic oomycete?

Oomycete oospores © Richard Shattock

Oomycete oospores © Richard Shattock

In its latest issue, Molecular Plant Pathology has published a list of the top 10 oomycete pathogens based on scientific and economic importance, as voted for by 62 scientists. This is the latest of the journal’s “Top 10” articles which have previously covered plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and viruses.

Oomycetes, also known as water molds, are often likened to fungi as they resemble filamentous fungi, and have similar feeding and reproduction methods. However, genetic analysis has shown that the two groups are actually phylogenetically very different and are now classified in separate kingdoms. Below you will find more information about the “Top 10″ plant pathogenic oomycetes, with links to further information available on the Plantwise knowledge bank.   Read more of this post

Factsheet of the month: May 2015 – Tolerant bean varieties against stem maggots

20157800266

The saying “prevention is better than cure” is no more true than when applied to agriculture. Taking precautionary measures against common pests can increase farmer income by investing a small amount of money into minimising crop losses, ensuring a high yield. Preventative measures can include correct land preparation, physical barriers, field hygiene and cultivation of tolerant varieties. Unlike resistant varieties, tolerant varieties can host the pest, but are not seriously affected by it. Different varieties have different levels of tolerance to different pests. It is therefore important for farmers to select a variety with tolerance to the pests known to occur in their area. This month’s Factsheet of the month ‘Tolerant bean varieties against stem maggots’ provides information about the use of bean varieties tolerant to stem maggots, also known as bean flies. Stem maggots are an important pest of legumes found mainly in Asia and East Africa. They feed by tunnelling into leaves, stems and roots, weakening the plant and increasing the chance of death in younger plants.

 This factsheet was written last year by staff from the Zambia Agriculture Research Institute (ZARI).

Read more of this post

Update: New Pest & Disease Records (29 Apr 15)

New records for insect pests of cashew have been identified in Guinea-Bissau. Photo: Terrie Schweitzer, via Flickr

New insect pests of cashew have been recorded in Guinea-Bissau. Photo: T. Schweitzer, via Flickr

We’ve selected a few of the latest new geographic, host and species records for plant pests and diseases from CAB Abstracts. Records this fortnight include new records of insect pests associated with cashew in Guinea-Bissau, the first report of Meloidogyne incognita from Radermachera sinica in China  and the first report of Fusarium solani f. sp. cucurbitae race 1 and 2 causing crown and root rot of watermelon in Iraq.

Read more of this post

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,834 other followers