Factsheet of the month: February 2016 – Rotation against purple seed stain in soya

20167800029At the beginning of January, a new research centre opened in Benin, which aims to boost productivity and incomes of smallholder farmers, and create job opportunities. Researchers based at the Green Innovation Center, which has been funded by the Federal German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), will develop tools for training and improve frameworks for collaboration and innovation with the ultimate goal of improving farmer livelihoods.

Initially, the centre will focus on pastoral agriculture, rice and soybeans, which are both important nutritional crops and key commodities in the area. Soybeans are particularly high in protein, a macronutrient which is still lacking in many diets in Subsaharan Africa. However, like all crops it is susceptible to numerous pests and diseases. This month’s factsheet of the month focuses on Purple Stain of soybean. This disease is caused by the fungus Cercospora kikuchii which causes seeds to turn purple and affects the price that they fetch on the market. Continue reading

Plant clinics help tackle crop diseases in Rwanda

Excerpt from The New Times article, published 22 January 2016

Plant clinics in Rwanda
Plant doctors examine farmers’ crop samples at Kinkanga Plant Health Clinic in Huye District on Monday. (Emmanuel Ntirenganya)

It is a Monday evening and Dominique Nkundukozera, a farmer in Rusatira Sector in Huye District, is seated on a chair at Kinkanga market, with several cassava stems. He had brought the stems for examination by experts at a ‘Plant Health Clinic’ at the market.

“Before the Plant Clinic initiative, I was losing about 60 per cent of my produce each season. It was unbearable because I could not even recoup the investment on the farm; however, since I started getting advice on disease management, losses have declined to 20 per cent”   Continue reading on The New Times website→

Bolivia: control de la mosca de la fruta en chirimoya

La mosca de la fruta es una plaga de mayor importancia en América latina, y solo en Bolivia, esta plaga causa pérdida de 113 millones de dólares cada año a los productores de frutas y hortalizas.

Los productores y productoras de chirimoya pueden revisar la Lista Verde producida por Plantwise que brinda asesoramiento sobre la prevención y el manejo cultural y biológico de la mosca de la fruta para evitar pérdidas importantes de sus cosechas.

Algunas medidas para el control de la mosca incluyen el manejo de malezas, recolección de frutos caídos, adelantar la cosecha, colocar trampas de feromonas y el uso de enemigos naturales ya como Beauveria bassiana.

Para más información sobre el control de plagas, visite Plantwise knowledge bank.chirimoya

Factsheet of the month: November 2015 – Using natural nematicide plants against banana nematodes

20157800105Researchers at Queen’s University, Belfast, have developed a new method to control the parasitic nematodes that devastate banana crops and cause billions of dollars of crop losses annually. It is hoped that this new technology will reduce these losses, boosting the incomes of subsistence farmers in developing countries.

Nematodes are notoriously difficult to control, and the most effective management practices are preventative. Chemical control using nematicides is not recommended for the control of nematodes as these chemicals are often expensive and highly toxic to both humans and the environment.  Continue reading

Factsheet of the month: October 2015 – Grain storage in metal silos against insect pests

20157800264Last week, 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the new Sustainable Development Agenda to end poverty by 2030. This came at the beginning of a three-day Summit on Sustainable Development during which focussed on implanting changes that will see the Agenda achieve its ambitious aims. The Agenda, consisting of 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), will help countries to develop their policies over the next 15 years.

The second SDG on the list is to “End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture.” Globally, 1 in 9 people are undernourished, the majority of whom are in developing countries where food loss is an important factor. Food loss is the food that gets spilled or spoilt before it reaches its final product or retail stage, whereas food waste happens at the retailer or consumer stage. Continue reading

Bolivia: caso confirmado de la Moniliasis del cacao

Frutos con varios síntomas (CABI)
Frutos con varios síntomas (CABI)

En junio 2015, se confirmó la presencia del hongo de la Moniliasis del cacao en Alto Beni, Departamento de La Paz a donde 85% de la producción de cacao es producida por aproximadamente 3000 pequeños y pequeñas agricultores. Este hongo (Moniliophthora roreri) es limitado en 13 países de América Latina y causa pérdidas importantes por los productores y productoras. Los síntomas característicos del hongo en los frutos incluyen madurez prematura, deformación, lesiones largas de color marrón y necrosis interna de los tejidos.

Para mantener un cultivo sano y prevenir la dispersión del hongo, revise la Lista Verde sobre la Moniliasis del cacao o para más detalles técnicos revise la Hoja técnica de Plantwise. Si se detecta los síntomas en regiones libres de la enfermedad, contacte el Ministerio de Agricultura de su país para recomendaciones de control locales.

Lista Verde: Moniliasis del cacao
Lista Verde: Moniliasis del cacao